Capt. Donald McLaren of Invernenty at Culloden

McLaurins in the 1745/46 Jacobite Rebellion
Argyll, Breadalbane and Balquhidder MacLaurins probably fought in the governments regiments, especially those with Campbell officers. Some Appin and Benderloch MacLaurins fought in the Stewart of Appin Clan Regiment, many historians leave the word clan out of the name. This was a clan regiment, fathers, sons, uncles and nephews, fighting in a horrific battle side by side, there were no outsiders. James Hunter in his book "Culloden and the Last Clansman" gives an accurate and graphic description of the Clan Stewart of Appin Regiment.

Most historians write that Capt. Donald MacLaren and his Balquhiddder McLarens fought with the Stewart of Appin Clan Regiment. They didn’t, that was an error made by William Anderson in 1867. What is of major concern, is that each and every “Historian” cites The Stewart of Appin Clan Regiment Order Book as his or her source. I have a certified digital copy of the Order Book provided to me by the National War Museum of Scotland. Donald MacLaren is not in the Order Book nor or any other Balquhidder men. This problem is common among the pulp clan histories mass produced with full color glossy covers.

Placing Donald MacLaren from Invernenty in the Appin Regiment started in 1867 with the publication of The Scottish Nation by William Anderson where William writes "The Maclaurins were out in the rebellion of 1745. According to President Forbes, they were followers of the Murrays of Atholl, but although some of them might have been so, the majority of the clan fought for the Pretender with the Stewarts of Appin under Stewart of Ardsheil. Among them Maclaurin of Invernenty, who was taken prisoner after the battle of Culloden." Anderson is the first history writer to mistakenly place Donald in the Appin Regiment, it was then repeated so often it became fact. Prisoners of the 45 placed Donald correctly in the Atholl Brigade in the first volume, but then in the third volume placed him in the Stewart of Appin Clan Regiment, go figure. Even the official Stewart of Appin histories have Donald in the Appin Regiment. Muster Roll of Prince Edward Stuart’s army 1745-46, Alistair Livingstone of Bachuill and other Editors, also got it wrong.

If he and his men were in the Appin Regiment, that would mean they looked to Appin as their chief. That is not the case though, Capt. Donald MacLaren was a vassal of the Duke of Atholl, so he was obligated to follow the dukes feudal authority, that was told to him by the Dukes factor, Gregor Murray MacGregor. Many times these messages were carried by the Blair Atholl gardener/courier, a McLaren.

"1745 August 22nd Duke James Murray of Atholl had sent orders to Gregor Murray at Coinneachan to raise the Glen Almond men and join Cope as he passed which he accordingly did at Amulrie. When the army reached Tay Bridge Gregor and his men left and continued to Blair to get further orders from Graham of Fintry the factor. He accompanied them back to the army which they rejoined at Dalnacardoch ; but as Cope would allow them no pay with which to support themselves, they dispersed there and returned to their homes."  (Atholl and Tullibardine Chronicles)

So it is likely that Donald MacLaren and other Balquhidder MacLarens were in the British Army for a short time in late August at the pleasure of the Hanoverian James Duke of Atholl. Gregor Murray was also instrumental in Donald's activities in late January, 1746, as you see in the letters below.

Balquhidder MacLaren Rebels
It appears from the MacPharrie account and contemporaneous letters written by our cast of characters, that Capt. Donald McLaren, his first cousin Lt. Duncan and other Balquhidder MacLarens served under the Duke of Perth in early weeks of the Jacobite Rebellion in the fall of 1745. Later, in early 1746, the records and letters indicate that vassals of The Duke of Atholl, in Balquhidder east to Glen Almond were recruited to the Atholl Brigade by Donald MacLaren and Gregor Murray at the Dukes' instruction. The MacLaren vassals of the Duke of Perth probably remained in the Perthshire Regiment. In a letter written by Gregor Murray he writes that Donald MacLaren went farm to farm recruiting under the nose of British troops stationed in the area. Donald was not able to use the fiery cross as instructed by the Duke because it would attract to much attention.

The Kirkton Meeting
There was a meeting at the Kirkton of Balquhidder on August 30th 1745. According to Macpharrie; Glengyle (M'Gregor), Glencarnaig (M'Gregor), Stewart of Glenbuckie and Buchanan of Arnprior met with the Duke of Perth (James Drummond) to arrange a muster on the 8th September. Glencarnaig and his two brothers with 8 followers mustered at noon on the 8th, and at 3pm, Glenbuckie arrived with 40 Stewarts and Ranald with a further 40 MacGregors. This group of a little under 100 marched for Callander." (History of the MacGregors, 1901)

31 Aug. 1745, Prince Charles and the Jacobite Clans arrived at Blair Castle. William Duke of Atholl after an exile of twenty-nine years took possession of his estates, to which, except for his attainder, he would have succeeded twenty-one years previously. 

“The Marquis of Tullibardiinie, Duke James's eldest brother, had landed in Scotland with the Prince in July 1745, and had taken up the hereditary title of Duke of Atholl, of which an Attainder had deprived him. To distinguish him from his brother, the de facto Duke, he is known in the Atholl family as "Duke William." He occupied Blair Castle in Sept. 1745, and on the same date sent similar warrants to other vassals. This warrant was for the service of King James VIII., with directions to join the army
under " His Royal Highness" Prince Edward's command, and Glencarnock and Glenbucky heartily responded.” (History of the MacGregors, 1901)

"This to empower and authorise you Alexr Steuart of Glenbucky and Robert Murray of Glencairnaig to be aiding and assisting to one another in raising for his Majesty's service my vassals of Balqhuidder and Tennants there upon my property Which I desire & require you may, with all expedition & Dispatch to Join the Army under his royal Highness Command Friday next at Perth or wherever the royal Standard may be for the time and this you are to perform with all diligence & care as you shall be answerable to
(Signed) " Atholl."
"Camp at Blair Septr 1745."  (Atholl and Tullibardine Chronicles)

4 Sept. 1745 the Prince arrives in Perth, 34 miles due east of Balquhidder and stays there until the 11th. It is while the Prince is in Perth that the Duke of Perth and Lord George Murray join the Jacobite Army. When the Prince arrived in Perth word was sent out across the land for supporters to gather in Perth and a tax was levied to finance the Army.

The Kirkton Muster
8 Sept. 1745 "According to promise Glencarnock, Duncan and Evan, his two oldest brothers and eight of our good men came to the place appointed at 12 o'clock. Glencarnock raised the MacGregor Standard, and none of the rest of the gentlemen appeared yet, about 3 o'clock came Steuart of Glenbuckie and forty men, and as Arnprior (Buchnan of Leny) was before them, MacGregor of Glencarnock and Steuart of Glenbuckie and Ronald MacGregor from Kirktown with forty men marched straight for Callander so that they would get Arnprior to join them at Callander: Arnprior met us at Kilmahog, no more with him but a single man. He invited Glencarnock and Glenbuckie up to Leny House that night; Glencarnock said that he and his men would be together at Callander, Glenbuckie went with him (Arnprior) to Leny that night, and shot himself before the morning. This made a confusion amongst us, such a thing happening so early. The Stewarts got him coffined, set off with him on their shoulders and got him tombed that night, and they never joined us more.” (History of Clan Gregor, 1901)

9 Sept, 1745 the MacGregors march west to the Barracks at Inversnaid on Loch Lomond to take control of the British Garrison posted there. The Stewarts of Glenbuckie family return to Glenbuckie after Alexanders suicide. The remainder of the forty men including Capt. Donald MacLaren and other Balquhidder MacLarens march south to Callander then on to Dunblane to meet the Jacobite Army on Sept. 11th or 12th. Some of the forty joined the Duke of Perth some the Atholl Brigade.

That’s all known about their fall 1745 activities, jumping forward to January, 1746.

7-8 Jan. 1746 The Siege of Stirling by the Jacobites. The town surrenders, but the castle is held by the Hanoverian troops Jan. 8 through the 31, 1746. Donald MacLaren was at Touch, along with Peter McLaren of Muthill and Malcolm McLarin from Invernenty (Taylor's Company) with the Duke of Perth's Regiment who was guarding the Jacobite Army baggage train and participating in the siege of the castle.The Perth Regiment and John Roy Stewarts Edinburgh Regiment were left to siege Stirling Castle while the rest of the Army headed southeast of Stirling on Plean Muir, towards what would be a significant Jacobite victory at the Battle of Falkirk Muir. According to the Memoirs of James Johnstone the Jacobite Army left Stirling Jan. 31, 1746 to make their way to Inverness. By this time Donald MacLaren was in Balquhidder. On Feb. 1st the Jacobite Army left Crieff which is to the east of Balquhidder.

Donald McLaren’s correspondence proves he and other Balquhidder men were in the Atholl Brigade at the request of the Duke of Atholl his feudal superior
The story that Capt Donald Mclaren of Invernenty led a discrete contingent of Balquhidder McLaren in the Appin Regiment is nonsense, which you can see for yourself from the following letters and contemporaneous information. 

26 Jan. 1746 The following letter is written by Donald McLaren to Capt. James Stewart of Clunes, Atholl Brigade requesting aid in recruiting the Earl of Murray Duke of Atholl tenants not just MacLarens. "Jacobite Correspondence of the Atholl Family", Page 159.
"Chronicles of Atholl and Tullibardine", Vol. III

The Duke of Atholls response to Grigor Murray MacGregor, requesting that he find Donald Macklairane, Drover in Balquhidder, hopefully in a good disposition and willing to help the Jacobite cause. As if he had a choice.
"Chronicles of Atholl and Tullibardine", Vol. III

On Feb. 8, 1746 The following letter is written by Grigor Murray to Mungo Murray.
It describes how Grigor Murray contact Capt. Donald MacLaren (the officer) who was away from the campaign at the end of the year with many others. Donald MacLaren went house to house in Balquhidder and Glen Almond to recruit men to the Jacobite cause. Donald could not use the Fiery Cross in fear it would attract attention from the local Redcoat garrison.
"Chronicles of Atholl and Tullibardine", Vol. III

It did not go well for James Stewart of Clunes and Gregor Murray who was executed, because James did not destroy these letters.

Post Culloden Balquhidder
"Duke James of Atholl (Hanoverian ) sent out from Perth to summon the Atholl vassals 'Innernenty (Invernenty) to go to Dunkeld and Kirkmichael to join the troops which were to be sent there to disarm and apprehend "the Rebells." Prince Charles on hearing that Duke James was to be at Dunkeld on the Saturday, and that a large body of the Redcoat troops were passing the West Boat of Dunkeld, retired with his forces from Blair, 10th Feb., to the North. A day or two afterwards Sir Andrew Agnew advanced from Dunkeld and took possession of the Castle. 

On June 22, 1746, Bisset the Hanoverian Duke of Atholls Factor, reported on the depredation in Balquhidder by Hanoverian troops, actively searching for rebels.

“The party that is at Crieff went to Ballquiddar and burnt Glencarnocks house and his whole tennents houses, Macklaren of Innernanties and Stewart of Ledericks, with some innocent persons houses that were interjected among these, and they carried off & disposed of their whole horses, cows, sheep and goats, and left that part of Ballquiddar entirely weast without in the least harming the Duke of Perths, Ardin prayers or any other Rebell lands in that country.” (Atholl Chronicles)

On 21 July he advised the Duke,

“I wrote your Grace formerly, that your vassalls Lands in Balquiddar and Bonrannoch have been plundered and that the houses burnt, by this Means, your Grace will be forfeit as well as your vassalls, since no feu dutys can be had unless the Tennents be allowed to rebuilt, of which I wish they had liberty, they being mostly such as were forced out by their Masters, and all of them submitted, and gave in their arms, in obedience to His Royall Highness's proclamation. I am informed that the Duke of Montrose is applying to the Privy Councill about some part of his country that was burnt.” (Atholl Chronicles)

With his home burned, livestock stolen, his wife and children lives in jeopardy, Capt. Donald MacLaren was captured in July of 1746, along with three other officers of the Atholl Brigade. "Upon the 15th Instant, Capt. James Campbell, commanding the Perth Volunteers in Balquhidder, having information of several Rebel Officers having returned to the Braes of that Country, went himself with a Party by the South side of the loch, whilst Daniel M’Euen, his Ensign, went up the Strath of that Country, towards Glenkarnock; but notwithstanding all the precaution used by the Captain, they found Means to escape, 12 towards the Braes of Brodalbine, and 18 towards the Breas of Lenny, and the Forrest of Glenartney. The Captain having Information thereof, marched with about 30 of his Men towards the Breas of Lenny, divided them so as to surround a party of them in a Sheill [a summer hut up in the hills used for grazing livestock], and to guard the Passes below, that none of them might escape. About Five o’Clock the Party under Ensign M’Euen surrounded a Lodge or Sheilling hut, from which they received a very brisk Fire, from the Door and two Windows, for 15 Minutes or upwards, which was returned by the Volunteers with the same Alacrity; afterwards the Rebels lodged in the Hutt, being all wounded except one, surrendered, viz. Major Stewart, Brother to the Laird of Advorlick; Capt. Malcolm M’Gregor of Comour; Capt. Donald MacLaren; Sergeant King, Alias M’Ree, late of Sir Patrick Murray’s Highland Regiment 2nd Battalion, Atholl Brigade, and three private Men. Of our Men none were hurt tho’ several Balls went through their Cloaths, especially Thomas More the late Lieutenant Follie, who always shewed himself upon every Occasion, "willing to destroy Rebels". (Extract of a Letter from Sterling, dated July 22, 1746)

As a result of Captain Donalds capture and the burning of Invernenty, with his wife Elizabeth and children escaping to her Stewart relatives at Blair Atholl, we know for certain that Donald MacLaren of East Invernenty’s “Invernenty sword” on display at the Culloden Battlefield Visitor Center today is a fake. That and the previous owner of the sword never made that claim. I know, I was around then in the early 1970s, long before current ‘powers that be’ in the Clan MacLaren Society North America or the Clan MacLaren Society, Scotland.

Dr. Janet MacLaren, the Clans Tutor purchased an ‘ancient scots broadsword’ it was given to Donald, Jr. when he reached his majority and became Chief of The MacLarens of Balquhidder and Strathearn. Dr. MacLaren’s intention was to establish a tradition as the symbolic ‘Protector of the Clan Sword’ that was to be passed on to future McLaren Clan Chiefs, After her death the ‘Protector of the Clan Sword’ became more useful to Donald MacLaren of MacLaren in 2006 as Captain Donald McLaren of Invernenty’s sword that miraculously survived Culloden and his capture by the British the following summer.

The ‘Protector of the Clan Sword’ became part of the bargain, along with a bank check, that Donald made with the National Trust for Scotland to have his name ‘MacLaren’ carved on the Appin Regiment Marker on the Culloden Battlefield. This deed accomplished with the Clan MacLaren Society North America and the Clan MacLaren Society, Scotland, without a single historical record to prove Donald’s claim that Balquhidder MacLarens fought in the Appin Regiment. See this website http://guardianofvalor.com/ for a description of what that kind of activity is called here in the USA.

“That all parties involved agreed that there was no historical evidence whatsoever that McLarens from Balquhidder fought in the Appin Regiment.” Dr. E. Hamish McLaren, Chairman Clan MacLaren Society, Clan MacLaren Society Newsletter, 2007

If ever there was a time to make the claim that the sword belonged to Dr. MacLaren’s ancestor Donald MacLaren of East Invernenty at this presentation was the time to do so. Dr. Janet MacLaren never ever claimed the sword belonged to her ancestor. The following is her description found in the now hidden from the public, Clan MacLaren USA “Quarterly” #16, page 48.



Clan McLaren Society, U. S. A. Quarterly Dec. 1972, Page 48 

Fifteen reasons why, Donald MacLaren of East Invernenty and other Balquhidder McLarens were not in the Stewart of Appin Clan Regiment
1. In 1736 James Murray 2nd Duke of Atholl granted a feu over two and a half merk land of Easter Invernenty for five scots annually to Donald M'Laren in Invernenty.
Chronicles of Atholl and Tullibardine Families.

2. In 1743 Donald and Duncan M'Laren in Invernenty together give a bond for 1300 Scots to the Duke of Atholl.
Chronicles of Atholl and Tullibardine Families.

3. The Hanoverian, Wiliam Murray Duke of Atholl, brought to bear his feudal superiority by issuing a Warrant for raising the whole Lands of Balquhidder for the King's service, addressed to Alexander Steuart of Glenbucky and Robert Murray (MacGregor) of Glencarnock dated Camp at Blair, Sept. 2, 1745. Apparently there was no pay available from the government, so the men  from Balquhidder returned home.
Chronicles of Atholl and Tullibardine Families. 

4. 8 Sept. 1745, MacLarens were probably at the Balquhidder Muster, as they were intermarried to both Alexander Stewart of Glenbuckie and Rober Murray MacGregor of Glencarnock families, the only two clan chiefs in Balquhidder at that time.
"According to promise Glencarnock, Duncan and Evan, his two oldest brothers and eight of our good men came to the place appointed at 12 o'clock. Glencarnock raised the MacGregor Standard, and none of the rest of the gentlemen appeared yet, about 3 o'clock came Steuart of Glenbuckie and forty men, and as Arnprior [Buchnan of Leny] was before them, MacGregor of Glencarnock and Steuart of Glenbuckie and Ronald MacGregor from Kirktown with forty men marched straight for Callander so that they would get Arnprior to join them at Callander : Arnprior met us at Kilmahog, no more with him but a single man. He invited Glencarnock and Glenbuckie up to Leny House that night ; Glencarnock said that he and his men would be together at Callander, Glenbuckie went with him [Arnprior] to Leny that night, and shot himself before the morning. This made a confusion amongst us, such a thing happening so early. The Stewarts got him coffined, set off with him on their shoulders and got him tombed that night, and they never joined us more.”
History of Clan Gregor, 1901 pg. 365

5. Donald MacLaren's letter to James Stewart of Clunes Atholl Brigade, Jan. 1746 from Touch, Stirling with John Roy Stewarts Edinburgh Regiment. See above.
Chronicles of Atholl and Tullibardine Families.

6. Willam Murray Duke of Atholl’s letter to Gregor Murray Feb. 1746, requesting Donald Macklairane, Drover in Balquhidder. See above.
Chronicles of Atholl and Tullibardine Families.

7. Grigor Murray to Mungo Murray letter Feb. 1746 describing the Duke of Atholls order to assemble at Blair Atholl. McGregor-Murray, Gregor of Coinneachan was executed for treason in Feb. 1746, captured and by the British, served in the Atholl Brigade as a Captain. See Above.
Chronicles of Atholl and Tullibardine Families.

8. Campbell of Glenorchy describing seeing Donald MacLaren the Drover with Sir Henry Sinclair and others on 22nd, April 1746. Donald was obviously not with the Appin Regiment on that day.
MS3735,#291 

9. Account of Donald’s capture with other Atholl Regiment Officers.
"In July of 1746 Capt. Donald MacLaren was captured along with three other officers of the Atholl Brigade. "Upon the 15th Instant, Capt. James Campbell, commanding the Perth Volunteers in Balquhidder, having information of several Rebel Officers having returned to the Braes of that Country, went himself with a Party by the South side of the loch, whilst Daniel M’Euen, his Ensign, went up the Strath of that Country, towards Glenkarnock; but notwithstanding all the precaution used by the Captain, they found Means to escape, 12 towards the Braes of Brodalbine, and 18 towards the Breas of Lenny, and the Forrest of Glenartney. The Captain having Information thereof, marched with about 30 of his Men towards the Breas of Lenny, divided them so as to surround a party of them in a Sheill [a summer hut up in the hills used for grazing livestock], and to guard the Passes below, that none of them might escape. About Five o’Clock the Party under Ensign M’Euen surrounded a Lodge or Sheilling hut, from which they received a very brisk Fire, from the Door and two Windows, for 15 Minutes or upwards, which was returned by the Volunteers with the same Alacrity; afterwards the Rebels lodged in the Hutt, being all wounded except one, surrendered, viz. Major Stewart, Brother to the Laird of Advorlick; Capt. Malcolm M’Gregor of Comour; Capt. Donald MacLaren; Sergeant King, Alias M’Ree, late of Sir Patrick Murray’s Highland Regiment 2nd Battalion, Atholl Brigade, and three private Men. Of our Men none were hurt tho’ several Balls went through their Cloaths, especially Thomas More the late Lieutenant Follie, who always shewed himself upon every Occasion, "willing to destroy Rebels". "Extract of a Letter from Sterling, dated July 22, 1746

10. Duncan Forbes, Lord Culloden [Lord President] account, places Balquhidder MacLarens in the Atholl Regiment.

11. The “Order Book of The Stewart of Appin Clan Regiment” see below, so often cited as the source for Donald MacLaren serving in the Appin Regiment, makes no mention of Donald or any other Balquhidder McLarens.

12. “Dugald Stewart of Appin's List” May 3, 1746, List of Heretors Tennants Servants and Cottars that are at home and of those that are abroad in the Present Rebellion out of the Country of Appine and Glencoe. There is no mention of Donald MacLaren of Invernenty. Only indigenous Appin Mclarines are cited. See Below.

13. “Campbell of Stonefield List July 6, 1746, List of persons within the parish of Lismore and Appin who have not delivered up thier Arms. 6 July 1746 at Islandstalker. There is no mention of Donald MacLaren of Invernenty. Again, only indigenous Appin McLearans are mentioned. See below.

14. Several of Donald’s relatives fought alongside him in the Atholl Brigade, his nephew Lt. Duncan MacLaren of W. Invernenty a brewer. Donald’s brother-in-laws, Donald Campbell Younger of Glenlyon, Archibald Roy Campbell of Glenlyon, Alexander Stewart of Duntaulich and Walter Stewart of Orchillbeg all in the Atholl Brigade.

15. On October 19, 1797, Lord Greenlee’s court dismisses the Stewart of Appin claim that Donald MacLaren was a follower of Dugald Stewart of Appin in 1745/46. Memorial by Donald’s eldest son and heir James MacLaren against the Represenatives of Appin to contest their claim for additional funds from the 26 June 1793 sale of Invernenty by the court. The Appin Stewarts claiming “He [Donald MacLaren] owed sundry debts to several persons, particularly to Dugald Stewart of Appin, who was his connection and confidential friend, who was a man of considerable influence in that part of the country [Balquhidder], and who had taken the memorialist’s father [Donald], as being one of his followers, under his protection and friendship.” “and on the 4th of April, 1748 the said Donald Maclaren conveyed his estae of Invernenty to Dugald Stewart, in the form of absolute disposition,” The Appin Stewarts claim, which implied that Donald MacLaren of Invernenty was Dugald Stewarts of Appin’s follower in 1745 and that Donald MacLaren had transferred Invernenty to Dugald Stewart, all the while overblowing Dugald Stewarts influence in Balquhidder; was dismissed by the court and found in James’s favor.
Memorial for James MacLaren against the Stewart of Appin Representative’s Oct. 19, 1797, Lord Greenlee, Reporter

Balquhidder Stewarts in the Stewart of Appin Clan Regiment
Dugald Stewart of Appin learned second hand that there were men from Balquhidder in the Appin Regiment. That inidividula was Capt. John Glas STEWART of Benmore (of the family of Coll of Appin), described as "brother of Acharn and cousin and brother in law of Stewart of Ardsheal was a Captain in the Appin Regiment and fell at Culloden."  He is described in Stewarts of the South as "descended of the family of Ardsheil, the most respectable Branch of Appin Stewarts.  He was know by the name of Iain Glac (sic "Glas") mhac Iain mhic Alastair.  (John "The Grey", son of John, grandson of Alexander.)  [John] gathered his substance by cattle dealing, brewing whisky, and by other pieces of industry.  [He] purchased Benmore in Glendochard from Drummond of Perth.  [It was] formerly the property of Campbell of Coirchaorach of the same place, also Campbell of Licks [in] Killin parish." 
Capt. John Glas Stewart's paternal ancestry from the Stewarts of Appin is shown here in brief:
John Stewart, 4th of Appin
John Stewart, 1st of Ardsheal
Duncan Stewart, 2nd of Ardsheal
Alexander Stewart, Ancestor of the Stewarts of Coll
John Stewart of Coll
Capt. John Glas Stewart of Benmore.  His children are presented immediately below:

Balquhidder McLarens in the Jacobite Army
ATHOLL BRIGADE
Captains
McLaren, Donald of East Invernenty
Lieutenants
Mclaren, Alexander, Ygr., of Easthaugh
Mclaren, Duncan, Brewer Wester Inverentie. Taken prisoner, Pardoned, Donald’s nephew
Mclaren, Orrott (Arratt) Uncle to Mclaren, Ygr., of Easthaugh
Other Ranks
Mclaren. Donald, Tenant, Dowally. Wounded Culloden
Mclaren, Duncan, Perthshire, 3rd Batt.Taken prisoner, transported
Mclaren, James, Servant to Haugh of Killmorich
Mclaren, John, Cottar, Rotwell wounded at Culloden
Mclaren, Robert,  (Whitefield's)

DUKE OF PERTH'S REGIMENT
Other Ranks
Maclaren, Peter, Farmer, Tobain, Muthill. Died from an accidental explosion

Maclarin, Malcolm, (Taylors Coy.) also from Invernenty

The Invernety Sword on display at the Culloden Battlefield

The "Protector of the Clan" sword presented to Donald MacLaren of MacLaren in 1973, by Dr. Janet McLaren his "Tutor" was repurposed by Donald MacLaren of MacLaren in 2007 by being represented to the National Trust for Scotland as belonging to Donald McLaren of Invernenty. That is an outright lie which means that Donald Maclaren of Maclaren defrauded the National Trust for Scotland. This lie along with his checkbook greased the wheels, which enabled this glory hunter to have his name 'MacLaren' carved on to the Appin Regiment Marker on the Culloden Battlefield. History for sale, sold to the highest bidder by the National Trust for Scotland

Dr. Janet MacLaren never claimed the sword belonged to her ancestor neither before or after it was presented to the new young Clan Chief in 1973

https://clanmclaurin.blogspot.com/p/blog-page_31.html

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