1957 Petition of Arms of Major Donald MacLaren and his son Donald Jr. to the Court of the Lord Lyon

Analysis of the Petition of Arms of Major Donald MacLaren and his son Donald Jr.

As in most things ‘historic’ with the modern Clan MacLaren there are no primary and few secondary sources for their clan history. The primary sources that are cited have been distorted to meet their needs like the Acts of Parlaiment, The 1573 Bond to Glenurchy and MS; 1467 for example. All to frequently heresay is used as a source and example being Patrick Stewarts statement that “McLarin of Achleskin, reckoned then to be chief of that name” in 1763 and the  words of Lord Advocate Sir George Mackenzie, "Head of the Clan" Labhran.

When they cannot find primary or secondary sources and after all the heresay is used, MacLarens turned to the novels of Sir Walter Scott and Robert Louis Stevenson, who privided them with the fictional ‘almost’ clan battle at Kirkton with the MacGregors, The alliance with the Stewarts of Appin the most well-known of the fiction. Used recently to desecrate the Stewart of Appin battlefield marker at Culloden in 2007.


The current MacLaren Chiefs family before the three generation gap circa 1717 shown below, were just crofters like everyone else, but in thier case, sub-servant tenants on the Edinchip Estate that was owned the Hereditary Chief’s of the Clan M’Gregor. They were not Highland Chiefs as claimed by their heir on his petition to The Court of the Lord Lyon in 1957.


UNTO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE THE LORD LYON KING OF ARMS.

The Petition of Major
DONALD MacLAREN of MacLAREN AND ACHLESKINE in the Earldom of Strathearn and County of Perth, CHIEF OF THE NAME OF MacLAREN, as Heir Male and Representative of the ancient House of Achleskine, HEAD OF THE CLAN LABHRAN.

Humbly Sheweth:

1. THAT the Petitioner, as hereinafter shewn, is the heir male and representative of the ancient House of Achleskine, Chiefs of the Name of MacLaren and hereditary Heads of the Clan Labhran; AND THAT the said Clan Labhran throughout its history has been centred on Achtoo within Achleskine in Balquhidder, in the ancient earldom of Strathearn.

The Primary source for the McLaren clan chief’s ‘duchthus’ at Auchleskine, came from Patrick Stewart in North Carolina in the year 1763.

"6th. Alexander was son to Duncan Stuart, of Glenbucky, by his wife McLarin, daughter to McLarin of Achleskin,
reckoned then to be chief of that name. " Patrick Stewart, Cheraw, South Carolina, 1763

Patrick Stewart dictated his lineage to his son, Charles Stewart on January 18, 1763, it states that his paternal ancestor Duncan Stewart, 3rd of Glenbuckie married the daughter of an Auchleskine McLaren, the chief of the clan McLaren, circa 1512-1540. This information from Patrick Stewart was mailed to George Crawford in Scotland, then published in George Crawford’s “History of Renfrew” and genealogy of the Stuarts in 1782. 

Patrick dictated his personal lineage in South Carolina, with the view to correct the errors made by Crawford in his 1710 lineage of the Stuarts. 

“The following genealogy was written by Charles, son of Patrick, Stuart and under his immediate direction, with a view of correcting some errors which had been committed by Crawford in his history of the Stuart family. This history had been sent by Crawford to Patrick Stuart, then in America, and he, perceiving the error, wrote to have it corrected, but never received a later edition of the work, and for that reason had his own genealogy made out and placed in his large family Bible, where it remained until the death of Ann, daughter of James, Stuart, son of Patrick. The said Ann was married to Edward Tongee, of Cain Acre, S. C. Edward Tongee died without children, and Ann Stuart his wife, married a Gist, of Union county, in the same State, and died without issue. Upon request this ancient paper was sent to the writer of these sheets, the book from which it was taken remaining with the Gist family.
Morgan Brown. 
Note. The writer knew Patrick Stuart and his writing, and has no doubt that the paper *sent to him was the original genealogy, and the proper signature of the said Patrick Stuart, whose pedigree it purports to be, and that it was made with his own hand.12th of March, 1826. Morgan Brown. “Some Stories of Colonial Families Stuart of South Carolina, The American Historical Registerm Sept, 1894 - Feb., 1895 Ed. Charles H. Browning, 1895


2. THAT the Petitioner is married to Margaret Miller, by whom he has an only son, Donald.

Major Donald MacLaren 
The Petitioner Major Donald MacLaren (22 Jul 1910 - 1966) was born in Turriff Parish, he never lived in Balquhidder. He was a business man in London after WWII.  Matriculate Arms 7 Feb 1958
Married Margaret Sinclair Miller (_ - 1978)Auchraw


3. THAT the Petitioner is the only son of the late Reverend Duncan MacLaren, Minister of Turriff, and Joan Gillieson his wife.

Rev. Duncan MacLaren 
There is no evidence anywhere of the Reverand being a clan chief. He was the 4th son - Rev. Duncan MacLaren (5 Feb. 1882 - 21 Nov. 1926), Minister of Turriff parish in Aberdeenshire.
Joan Gillieson (1881 - ) his wife. He graduated from the University of Glasgow in 1903 with a M.A., University of Edinburgh in 1906 with a Bachelor of Divinity (B.D.)1 He was Minister in 1907 at Turriff, Aberdeenshire  http://www.thepeerage.com/p50576.htm#i505753


4. THAT the said Duncan MacLaren was fourth son but in his issue eventual heir male of Donald MacLaren, younger in Achtoo (and later in Kirkton of Balquhidder), and Mary Stewart his wife.

Donald MacLaren, younger in Achtoo
There is no evidence anywhere of Donald being a clan chief. He was the 2nd eldest surviving son - Donald MacLaren Younger in Achtoo (1840 - 1913) died in Turriff. He was married to Mary Stewart 18 Dec. 1872
Donald MacLaren Younger in Achtoo was a tenant of the Hereditary Chief, Sir Malcolm MacGregor of MacGregor, Bart., Edinchip, Lochearnhead, Balquhidder, Scotland. (b. 1873; suc. 1879), is owner of 4050 acres in the shire (Achtoo in Edinchip), of an annual value of £1131,5s.


5. THAT the said Donald MacLaren was the second but eldest surviving son of Donald MacLaren in Achtoo (the last of Clan Labhran to hold Achtoo within Achleskine, the ancient centre of the clan), and Katherine McDiarmid his wife.

Donald MacLaren in Achtoo 
There is no evidence anywhere of Donald being a clan chief. He was the eldest son - Donald MacLaren in Achtoo (1811/13 - 1892), He was married to Catherine McDairmid (__ - 1892). Donald in Achtoo was a tenant of Hereditary Chief Sir John M'Gregor of Macgregor, Edinchip.


6. THAT the said Donald MacLaren in Achtoo was the eldest son of Donald MacLaren in Achtoo and Katherine MacGregor his wife.

Donald MacLaren in Achtoo 
There is no evidence anywhere of Donald being a clan chief. He was the 2nd eldest surviving son - Donald MacLaren in Achtoo (1782 - __), married to Catherine MacGregor. Donald in  Achtoo part of the Edinchip estate is owned by Sir John Murray of Lanrick, Bart. (cre. 1795), Hereditary Chief of the Gregor clan, https://www.scottish-places.info/towns/townhistory503.html

II. Patrick Fergusson, son of preceding, married Isabella M'Diarmid, held a lease of the farm of Stronier, now part of
Laggan Farm, near Strathyre, and came to Auchleskine in the year 1808.

Finlay's son Patrick (II.) obtained a lease of Auchleskine in 1808, from Sir John M'Gregor of Macgregor, Edinchip,
and was associated with his three sons, John, Duncan, and Peter. Finlay the eldest son was a schoolmaster in
Edinburgh, and married. He had one son and two daughters. The son was named Patrick, after his grandfather, and
was a veterinary surgeon in Peebles. The daughters were Margaret and Marion Alexander, the youngest son of Patrick
F. II., was blacksmith in Balquhidder, and had his smithy at Auchleskine until he died. He was married and had a son
Alexander, and a daughter Isabella. Christina, the youngest daughter of Patrick F. II., married Duncan M'Diarmid in
Balquhidder. “Records of The Clan Fergusson or Ferguson”, Edited for The Clan Fergus(s)on Society by
James Ferguson and Robert menzies Fergusson, 1899


7. THAT the said Donald MacLaren in Achtoo was the second but eldest surviving son of Malcolm MacLaren in Wester Achtoo and Katherine Ferguson his wife.

Malcolm MacLaren in Wester Achtoo 
There is no evidence anywhere of Malcolm being a clan chief. He was the 4th son Malcolm MacLaren (1734 - __) in Westar Achtoo, he was married to Catherine Ferguson (____ -____)


8. THAT the said Malcolm MacLaren in Wester Achtoo was the fourth son but eventual heir male of John MacLaren in Wester Achtoo and Mary McIntyre his wife.

John MacLaren in Wester Achtoo
There is no evidence anywhere of John being a clan chief.  He was the eldest son John MacLaren (1690 - 1747/55)
He was married to Mary McIntyre.


9. THAT the said John MacLaren in Wester Achtoo was the elder son of Finlay MacLaren in Wester Achtoo, who held there in 1717.

Finlay MacLaren in Wester Achtoo
There is no evidence anywhere of Finlay being a clan chief.  Finlay MacLaren in Westar Achtoo 1717 (__ - 1733/47)


10. THAT the lands of Achleskine in general formerly comprised the several townships and lands of Wester Achtoo, Middle Achtoo, Easter Achtoo and Achleskine in particular, all of which were held by the chiefly house of MacLaren, who had their own burial place in the kirkyard of Balquhidder separate from the burial places of the cadet houses and following of the Clan Labhran.

The oldest grave in the Balquhidder kirkyard is Rob Roy M’Gregor 1671 - 1734. The oldest McLaren grave is John MacLaurin (1717 - 20 Dec. 1788), married to Janet MacGregor, 1747–1797. There is no evidence to support the statement that the McLaren chiefs were buried in a special place in the cemetery,seperate from the cadet houses and followers.


11. THAT, doubtless owing to the downfall by forfeiture of the Celtic earldom of Strathearn in the fourteenth century, the Clan Labhran had no feudal confirmation of their ancient patrimony, but nevertheless were not dispossessed of Achleskine, or Achtoo which their principal family held in tack from generation to generation until the death of the Petitioner's said great-grandfather in 1892.

The first account of a McLaren in Balquhidder was in 1512 at Invernenty, the more likely chiefly line.
“At Stirling, on the first of June in the 512th year [ie 1512]. Innernenty; £6 13s 4d, with the consent of William Stewart who had the same in fee-farm, is now assessed to the underwritten tenants just as is particularized above, that is to say,
To Donald Makyntyr, £5 for two marklands and a half, to be paid in respect thereof annually, with part of the marts,

To John Makyntyr, £5 for two marklands and a half, to be paid in respect thereof annually, with part of the marts,

To Gilbert Makyntyr, £5 for two marklands and a half, to be paid in respect thereof annually, with part of the marts,

To Duncan Makyntyr, 1s for one markland and a 40 shillings land, to be paid in respect thereof annually, with part of the marts,

And to Malcolm Maklawryn, 1s for one markland and a 40 shillings land, With this condition, that the rest of the tenants of the Lord of Buchquhiddir shall have licence to take timber for their necessities, without destruction [of the woodland], And for entry of a new infeudation £40, out of which sum £13 6s 8d is to be paid by the said tenants, and £26 13s 4d by the said William Stewart. (transcribed from Rotuli scaccarii Regum Scotorum Vol. VIII, Pg. 638)


12. THAT Ensigns Armorial of an Achleskine MacLaren cadet, duly differenced as set forth in the Matriculation, were recorded in the Public Register of All Arms and Bearings in Scotland on 23rd April 1866 in the name of Daniel MacLauren, fifth son but then heir male of John MacLaren in Lichnascridan, who was second son of Duncan MacLaren, styled in Achleskine, younger son of the said Finlay MacLaren in Wester Achtoo.

Daniel MacLaurin of Auchleskine
Finlay MacLaren in Westar Achtoo 1717 (__ - 1733/47) above see 9. His 2nd son John MacLaren in Lichnascridan, John’s 5th son Daniel MacLaurin of Auchleskine matriculated Arms 23 April 1866


13. THAT the said Daniel's branch of the House of Achleskine had used the ancient family Arms differenced by a bordure engrailed Gules (namely of the principal colour of the ancestral coat), which Arms were those appropriate only to a second son's line of a younger son's line of the main stock or stem of the Chiefs of the Clan and Name of MacLaren; THAT the said Daniel's father was in fact a second son of a younger son of the Petitioner's forefather, the said Finlay MacLaren in Wester Achtoo (within Achleskine) who held there in 1717; AND THAT the petitioner is thus Head of the senior line to the established armorial branch within the House of Achleskine, which branch bore Arms differenced in such a way as to demonstrate that the said senior line (of which the Petitioner is Head) are Chiefs of their whole Name of MacLaren.

There were no ancient McLaren family arms, they were fabricated by James Logan with the first description of the MacLaren Arms in his text found in “McIan’s Costumes” 1840.

The earliest account of the legend that the MacLarens came from a race of mermaids is from 'McIan's Costumes of the Clans of Scotland' by James Logan and Robert McIan, 1846. You probably have a copy on your coffee table.

In 1781 John MacLaurin Lord Dreghorn 1734-1796 became the clan chief the McLaurins. John's coat of arms heraldry included two Britons as supporters on each side of the shield, depicting what I believe to be St. Moluag's staff. The one that Naill Livingstone of Bachuill possesses. MacLea/Livingstone and McLaurin/McLaren YDNA is similar by the way.

At some point in the early 1800's, a heraldic artist depicted John MacLaurin Lord Dreghorn's coat of arms with two 'Tritons' instead of 'Britons", apparently misreading the written description of John MacLaurin's COA's, as you can see below.

In the 1840's, so-called Scottish historian James Logan mistook the 'Tritons' for 'Mermaids', they are similar in appearance and apparently he did not bother to double check John MacLaurin's COA's written description.

Logan and MacIan published the following.

"There is a traditional origin given of the Mac Laurins, with reference to a mermaid, which is among the most puerile of the many similar legends; but it was sufficient to induce the heralds to assign armorial bearings, allusive to the fancied occurance, when the eminent Lord Dreghorn, who claimed the chief ship, applied, in 1781, for matriculation of these family honours in the Lyon College of Arms." James Logan, 'McIan's Costumes of the Clans of Scotland' by James Logan and Robert McIan, 1846. You probably have a copy on your coffee table.

The ‘Britons’ mistook for ‘Tritons’, then mistook for ‘Mermaids’.


14. THAT the said Finlay MacLaren in Wester Achtoo, great-grandfather of the said Daniel and great-great-grandfather to the Petitioner's great-grandfather, was the son of Donald MacLaren in Achleskine, who was the son of Finlay MacLaren in Achleskine wherein a race of MacLarens appear continuously settled, of whom the Head was, early in the sixteenth century, reckoned Chief of the Name of MacLaren; AND THAT in the nineteenth century this House was still referred to as "the Achleskine, or principal branch of the Clan Laurin, claiming the Title of Representative of the Clan".

This is basically a reworded 1. above with the same response. Adding that the nineteenth century writers all copied one another repeating the same thing over and over again until the lie as become truth.


15. THAT the Clan Labhran in Balquhidder was certainly represented by a Head or Chief in the years 1594 and 1587, as appears from the Acts of Parliament of those years; cont.

These are the Scottish Acts of Parliamant lists the first clan maps were made from, unfortunately Johnston and Robertson placed Clan Lawren in Balquhidder instead of Breadalbane where Clanlaurane was located. The suppressed in Clan MacLaren history Breadalbane/Loch Tay Clanlaurane/ClanLawren is well documented in the Black Book of Taymouth and in Bonds found in The National records of Scotland. Once these maps were published the error was repaeated so often that it has become fact.

“The Roll of the Clannis (in the Hielands and Isles) that hes Captanes, Chieffs, and Chiftanes quhome on they
depend. Oft tymes aganis the willis of Thair Landislords: and of sum speciale personis of branchis of the said is
Clannes, 1587” Acts of Parliament

Abridged list in order:
Stewartis of Buchquhidder
Clangregour
Clanlawren, 1573 Bond by Clanlawren in Breadalbane and Loch Tay, not Balquhidder.
Campbells of Lochnell
Campbell of Innerraw

List of Clans and Broken Men Contained In Act of 1594
 " For Punisement of thift, reif, oppressioun, and sorning " (1594, c. T,y, Act. Pari. Scot., vol. iv., p. 71). The preamble, so far as relating to the Highlands, is as follows : —
Oure Soverane Lord and his estaitis in this present Parliament, considering that, nochtwithstanding the sindrie actis maid be his Hienes, and his maist nobill progenitouris, for punischment of the authoris of thift, reiff oppressioun, and sorninf, and masteris and sustenaries of thevis ; yet sic hes bene, and presentlie is, the barbarous cruelties and daylie heirschippis of the wickit thevis and lymmaris of the clannis and surenames following, inhabiting the Hielands and lies ; Thay ar to say : — 

Abridged list in order
Clangregour.
Clanfarlane.
Clanlawren. 1573 Bond and 1587 Clanlawren Acts of Parliament in Breadalbane and Loch Tay, not Balquhidder.
Clandowill. 
Clandonochie.”

cont. THAT Finlay McNeill VcLaurence in Achleskine appears on record in 1586; cont.

Here the petition SKIPS at least three generations to Finley M’Neill V’Laurence in Auchleskine 1586 Bond. Listed nowhere in this Petition is the real Balquhidder clan chief was Johne Malolchallum V’Lauren in Comrie the first man listed in the 1559 V’Lauren in Balquhidder Bond, who was murdered by the Glenbuckie Stewarts. His father Malcolm Maklyrn in Invernenty preceded him as chief, arriving there in 1512. Below is the Bond that resulted from John’s murder.

BOND OF  MANRENT by Alester Stewart in Glenbokie in Buchquhidder, Patrik, Duncane, Robert, James, Johne, and Walter Stewartis his sons, James Stewart in Glenfinglas, Johne, Duncane and Alester Stewartis his sons, Walter Stewart in Balliefoyille and Robert Stewart his son, Johne Dow Stewart son to Patrik Stewart in Dallie-laggane (Glenbuckie) to Duncane Campbell of Glenurquhay and his heirs, and that because a certain number of them had upon suddantie slain Johne Makolchalluin Comrie (V’Lauren, A. 1559 Balq. Bond) who and his forbears was kynd mynd and servants to the said Duncane Campbell of Glenurquhay and his predecessors ; they, being maist willing to repair his honour, bind them severally, to give him and his heirs a free gift of the best audit at the time of their decease, which is called a Calp, besides that due to the Earls of Argyle, and to be true men and servants to him and his against all persons, the authority the Earls of Argyle and  the masters of their mailings lands and steadings alone excepted,  and to be ready to them in hosting and hunting when required, and to supply reasonable help, according to their power, in any honourable turn tending to the relief of lands or otherwise for the honour of the said Duncane Campbell's house and furtherance of the same : Evin Dow Campbell of the Likkis, Johne Roy Makinstalker in Cranduycht, Archebald Campbell fiar of Monze James Campbell apparent of Laweris, Johne Hendrysone, Donald Makrobert in Candroquhat, Johne Makindewer in Portbane, Patrik M'Robert V'Laurent in the Port at the east end of Locherne and Donald Maklaurene in Dalbeyich and Finlay Makneill V'Laurent in Auchaliskin in Balquhidder witnesses. At Illanrane 28 April 1586.

cont. THAT the said House of Achleskine did, according to family tradition, hold its lands of Achleskine (including Achtoo) from a period long anterior to the fourteenth century, when the three sons of the then Chief were traditionally progenitors of the MacLaren Houses of Achleskine, Stank and Bruach; AND THAT the said three sons are understood to have been John, Donald and Anichol, sons of Malcolm who, according to the genealogy of Clan Labhran given in the Gaelic MS. of 1467, was fourth in descent from the Celtic abbot of Achtus (that is, Ach-tuas or Achtoo within Achleskine in Balquhidder, still held by the Petitioner's family until 1892) which abbot's name may be inferred from the heading of the said genealogy to have been Laurence, as tradition confirms, as also that he was the eponymous ancestor of the Clan Labhran and its stem family, the ancient House of MacLaren of Achleskine, whom the Petitioner now represents as set forth.

Modern Scottish scholarly analysis of the mentioned above “The Gaelic MS, of 1467” by Ronnie and Mairi Black clearly shows that the Genealogy of Clan Labhran is actually that of the McLaverty’s on the west coast of Scotland and not McLarens at all. So, the Abbot of Achtus, John, Donald and Anichol the Young never existed in Balquhidder. http://www.1467manuscript.co.uk/index.html, http://www.1467manuscript.co.uk/kindred%2010.html


16. THAT the Arms anciently borne by the Petitioner's ancestor, that is the common ancestor of the said Daniel and of the Petitioner, are indicative of the MacLarens being, as their family tradition avers, an early cadet branch of the Celtic dynasts of Strathearn (afterwards earls "Dei Indulgentia"); AND THAT the whole circumstances are consistent with a reasonable presumption that Ensigns Armorial were borne by the Chiefs of the Clan Labhran anterior to the year 1672.

A repeat of the above concerning the heraldry 13.

MAY it therefore please your Lordship: (primo) to recognize officially the Petitioner and his son in the name of MacLaren of MacLaren with designation of Achleskine, viz. Donald MacLaren of MacLaren and Achleskine, and Donald MacLaren of MacLaren and Achleskine, younger; (secundo) to grant, ratify and confirm unto the Petitioner the Arms appropriate to him as representative of the House of Achleskine and, as representer of the family, in the sense and words of Lord Advocate Sir George Mackenzie, "Head of the Clan" Labhran (evidently descending from the Celtic abbot of Achtoo and apparently an early branch of the race of the Celtic earls of Strathearn), namely the undifferenced Arms of the stock or stem of the Name (of?) MacLaren and House of Achleskine, along with such exterior (additaments?) as may by your Lordship be found suitable; or to do further or otherwise in the premises as shall to your Lordship seem proper.

And your Petitioner will ever pray. {Iain Moncreiffe of Easter Moncreiffe.} {Unicorn.}

{1st. July, 1957.}

Achleskine was not the ‘House of Achleskine’ for the MacLarens because they never owned it. Major Donald MacLaren did not descend from the Celtic abbot of Achtoo because who never existed.


NOTES
Auchleskine - ‘Auchleskine, Akleskin, Achadh le sgiathan = "field of the wing / portion". Sgiath also means "shield" and thus may result in "shielded / sheltered field.”

Achleskine NN543209 (1) S 347 145m BQR [ax'lg skin]

Auchleskie 1755 (Anon. 1973, 44-5)

East Achleskine, West Achleskine 1783 (Stobie)

This name is to be compared with Auchlinsky, GDV, which seems to be Gachadh^ an fhleasgaich 'estate of the younger son or cadet' (see fleasgach^) . Rather than fleasgach the n of the last syllable in the BQR name may indicate an Earlier Irish dimin. flescân, from flesc which could mean both 'youth' or 'stripling' and 'chief' . This would give achadh an fhlesgain 'estate of the young or minor chief' , or 'of the younger son', consistent with the MacLaren tradition outlined in Part Two, p494. For Achleskine multiple estate see Part Two, p513. “Place-Names, Land and Lorship in the Medieval Earldom of Strathearn”, Angus Watso Ph.d Thesis, 2002

1511
[Jas IV grants to John Ros] terras de Auahxnleskane, Tullochlembar Lakenscredane cum molendino [Leacann Sgridain+ BQR], le Kirktoun le thre Auchttowis r Cowill [Guilt BQR) , Drumnes [BLF?] [which the
grantee's father John Ros of Craigie [PER] had resigned] 1511 {JRMS ii no 3668)

1512-1540
"6th. Alexander was son to Duncan Stuart, of Glenbucky, by his wife McLarin, daughter to McLarin of Achleskin,
reckoned then to be chief of that name.
Patrick dictated his personal lineage in North Carolina, with the view to correct the errors made by Crawford in his 1710 lineage of the Stuarts. 

“The following genealogy was written by Charles, son of Patrick, Stuart and under his immediate direction, with a view of correcting some errors which had been committed by Crawford in his history of the Stuart family. This history had been sent by Crawford to Patrick Stuart, then in America, and he, perceiving the error, wrote to have it corrected, but never received a later edition of the work, and for that reason had his own genealogy made out and placed in his large family Bible, where it remained until the death of Ann, daughter of James, Stuart, son of Patrick. The said Ann was married to Edward Tongee, of Cain Acre, S. C. Edward Tongee died without children, and Ann Stuart his wife, married a Gist, of Union county, in the same State, and died without issue. Upon request this ancient paper was sent to the writer of these sheets, the book from which it was taken remaining with the Gist family.
Morgan Brown. 
Note. The writer knew Patrick Stuart and his writing, and has no doubt that the paper *sent to him was the original genealogy, and the proper signature of the said Patrick Stuart, whose pedigree it purports to be, and that it was made with his own hand.12th of March, 1826. Morgan Brown. “Some Stories of Colonial Families Stuart of South Carolina, The American Historical Registerm Sept, 1894 - Feb., 1895 Ed. Charles H. Browning, 1895

1541
Auahleskin^ Kirktoun de Balquhidthir^ Lauchinskreden, cum earundem molendinof Tulloch cum tribus Auchintowis^ Cowill, Coltuchchir [FDY]1541 {RMS iii no 2448)

1558
Auchlesken, Kirktoun de Balquhidder, Lauchin s k r e d e n . , Tulloch, cum tribus Auchintowis, Cowill 1558 {RMS iv no 1331) 

In 1558 John Ross of Craigie sold Auchleskine, the Kirkton of Balquhidder, Lednascriden with the mill, the three Achtows, Tulloch, and Cuilt to David Lord Drummond and his spouse Dame Lilias Ruthven. The lands were forfeited to the Crown by the Jacobite Drummonds in 1746.

“On the 8th January 1558 a charter of confirmation from Francis and Mary, King and Queen of Scotland, confirmed a charter by John Ross of Craigie in favour of David Lord Drummond [32]. This was followed by an agreement of sale by John Ross, to David Lord Drummond, and to Dame Lilias Ruthven his spouse, of the lands of Auchleskine, the Kirkton of Balquhidder, Lednascriden with the mill, the three Achtows, Tulloch, and Cuilt, in the Lordship of Balquhidder [33]. The contract was registered at Perth on the 20th May 1558.”

1564
Anahleskin, Kirktoun de Balquhidder, Lauchinskreden cum molendino earundem, Tulloch, cum tribus Auchtowis, Cowill in baronia de Cragye 1564 {RMS iv no 1524)

1576
Duncane McAllester Pudriche in Achatue, Achtoo, History of Clan Gregor Vol. I pg. 328

1586
Bond of Manrent to Duncane Campbell of Glenurquhay and his heirs. On the other part apparent of Laweris(Lawyer) Johne Hendrysone, Donald Makrobert in Candroquhat(?), Johne Makindewer in Portbane(Loch Tay), and Donald Maklaurene in Dalbeyich(Dalveich, Loch Earn), and Finlay Makneill V'Laurent in Auchaliskin(Auchleskin, River Belvag just east of Loch Voil}, witnesses. At Illanrane 28 April 1586. Black Book of Taymouth

“The Drummond Earls of Perth retained the Barony of Balquhidder until its forfeiture in 1746 [34].”

Inv. Drummond Writs. Vol 1. pp. 80 - 86.25/1 S. R. O., 33. Ibid. Vol. I. pp. 80 - 86.25/2 S. R. O., 34. Ibid. Vol. III. p. 16. S. R. O., A Thesis “Highland Settlement Evolution in West Perthshire " James Henderson Stewart, 1986

1604
Duncan Pudrache M'Gregour, in Achtoo, Balquhidder, son Of Duncane McAllester Pudriche in Achatue, above History of Clan Gregor Vol. I pg. 329

1662
terrlas] de Aachleskine, Kirktoun de Balquhidder, Leddinscridden cum molendino, terras de Tulloche cum tribus Auchatowes et terras de Coble [read Coule] 1662 {Retours Perth 708)

1745
“Fergusons of Auchleskine, Balquhidder
For several generations Auchleskine has been occupied by families of the name; and the present tenant of the farm can trace his family's connection for over a century. From the Parish Baptismal Register it is seen that a John Fergusson and his wife Janet M'Laren in Auchleskine had, on 21st March 1745, a child baptized named Janet. In 1802 Duncan Fergusson and his wife Mary Stewart had a child baptized, on 2nd September, named Alexander. Mr. Patrick Fergusson, the present occupier of Auchleskine, gives the following as his descent:

I. Finlay Fergusson, married Catherine Dewar, held a house and croft at Tiofhness, in the east end of Strathyre, at the time of Prince Charlie's Rebellion in 1745. Finlay was out with Prince Charlie, but took no active part in the Rebellion of 1745. When the king's soldiers came to Balquhidder in 1746 to look after the followers of Prince Charlie, Finlay was forced to go into hiding, and on the soldiers calling at the house to secure him he could not be found. His wife refused to tell them where he was, and on the soldiers beginning to abuse her she complained to their officer, Captain Campbell, that his men were treating her badly. The Captain inquiring if she had any armour belonging to Prince Charlie she answered in Gaelic, ' Cha 'n'eil Tarrigh,' ' no not a nail.' So he told his men to let the woman alone at once.

II. Patrick Fergusson, son of preceding, married Isabella M'Diarmid, held a lease of the farm of Stronier, now part of Laggan Farm, near Strathyre, and came to Auchleskine in the year 1808.

Finlay's son Patrick (II.) obtained a lease of Auchleskine in 1808, from Sir John M'Gregor of Macgregor, Edinchip, and was associated with his three sons, John, Duncan, and Peter. Finlay the eldest son was a schoolmaster in Edinburgh, and married. He had one son and two daughters. The son was named Patrick, after his grandfather, and was a veterinary surgeon in Peebles. The daughters were Margaret and Marion Alexander, the youngest son of Patrick F. II., was blacksmith in Balquhidder, and had his smithy at Auchleskine until he died. He was married and had a son Alexander, and a daughter Isabella. Christina, the youngest daughter of Patrick F. II., married Duncan M'Diarmid in Balquhidder. “Records of The Clan Fergusson or Ferguson”, Edited for The Clan Fergus(s)on Society by James Ferguson and Robert menzies Fergusson, 1899

1782
Estate of Edenchip, between Lochearnhead village and the station, was purchased from the Commissioners of Forfeited Estates by Sir John Murray of Lanrick, Bart. (cre. 1795), chief of the Gregor clan, whose descendant, Sir Malcolm Macgregor, fifth Bart. (b. 1873; suc. 1879), is owner of 4050 acres in the shire, of an annual value of £1131,5s. 

1865
In 1865 Daniel MacLaurin was born at Auchleskine, Balquhidder in 1778 of John MacLaurin and Janet MacGregor. Daniel an attorney "Writer to his Majesty's Signet", wrote a short book entitled "History in Memorium of the Clan Laurin: Antecedently and subsequently to its almost entire destruction in the year A. D. 1558", Daniel also incorporated a version of James Logan's history of Clan Laurin published in "McIan's Costumes" twenty years earlier in 1845.

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